Clark County (Nev.) School Board members have officially postponed a $7 billion bond election until 2010. The bond issue had been planned for November and would have raised money for 73 new schools over the next 10 years. Hotel and real estate transfer taxes would have provided the rest of the money needed for the $9.5 billion plan. School officials noted that enrollment declined by 4,000 during the last school year, indicating that families are leaving the area. Growth is expected to be flat or minimal for the coming school year. Normally, the nation's fifth largest school district is used to accommodating growth of 10,000 to 12,000 additional students a year.
To read The Las Vegas Review-Journal article, click here.

EARLIER: The Clark County (Nev.) School Board has indicated it will withdraw its bond measure from the November ballot, citing lower-than-expected enrollment growth and a shaky economy that could erode voter support. The decision comes as analysts predict record lows in the percentage of new students for the next few years. Coupled with a slowing economy, the time isn't right to ask the public to support a bond of such magnitude, says Joyce Haldeman, deputy superintendent of community and government relations.
To read The Las Vegas Sun article, click here.

FROM NOVEMBER 2007: The Clark County School District has unveiled a school construction proposal that, if approved by voters in November 2008, would be the largest in state history. The $9.5 billion, 10-year plan would pay for construction of 73 new schools. The nation's fifth-largest school system has nearly 309,000 students. District officials predict the enrollment will grow to 473,000 students by 2018. The district is still building schools under a $3.5 billion, 10-year bond measure passed in 1998. (Las Vegas Review-Journal)