Denver residents have voted for the largest bond request in Colorado history. The sale of $454 million in bonds will pay for critical school repairs, build new schools and restore historic North High School.
To read The Denver Post article, click here.

FROM SEPTEMBER 2008: If there is controversy in the $454 million bond issue for Denver Public Schools, it is the planned reconstruction of North High School. The district wants to use $34 million to remodel the original 1911 school building and mothball the connecting 1913 building. The money would be used to refurbish tennis courts, the track and the football field. North is less than half full of students and has had three principals in three years, and two years ago its teachers were forced to reapply for their jobs. One vocal community member has urged the district to wash its hands of North, sell off the old buildings and build a new school for the area.
To read The Denver Post article, click here.

EARLIER: Denver voters in November will decide the fate of a $454 million school bond package — the largest in Colorado history. The 20-year bond proposal would pay for new schools, roofs, boilers, playgrounds, athletic fields and general maintenance. One school that would benefit is North High, which opened in 1911. It would get about $34 million for remodeling work.
To read The Denver Post article, click here.

FROM AUGUST 2008: A citizens' group exploring building needs in Denver Public Schools is recommending that the district seek its largest-ever bond issue. If school board members agree, and they're expected to, the school district will ask voters Nov. 4 to approve a ballot question totaling $454 million. The biggest chunk of the proposal is $273 million for what committee members deemed "significant and critical" maintenance. That includes roofs, boilers, windows and other upgrades to meet building codes and safety concerns in 140 schools.
To read The Rocky Mountain News article, click here.

FROM JUNE 2008: The Denver school board has approved a resolution to notify the city elections commission that the district plans to participate in the fall election. The election would be the district's its first bond issue in five years. Officials have not decided on the size of the request, but are reported to be considering a package between $300 million and $600 million. A citizens group has identified about $300 million in "critical and significant" maintenance needs and about $300 million in new projects. (Rocky Mountain News)