Inadequate financial support for public schools is biggest problem facing the U.S. education system, according to the latest Gallup-Phi Delta Kappa poll on education issues.

Lack of funding was by far the most common single response Americans cited as the biggest challenge facing schools in their communities," according to the 44th annual PDK/Gallup Poll of the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools.

In the 2012 poll, 35 percent of those questioned identified lack of funding as the most critical education issue, compared with 23 percent in the 2002 survey. Among parents of public school children, the concern is even greater—43 percent say inadequate funding is the biggest issue facing schools.

The poll also showed that concerns about discipline, crowding, gang violence and drugs in schools are less pronounced. Lack of discipline was cited as the biggest education problem by 8 percent of those surveyed in 2012, compared with 17 percent in 2002.

In the report, "What Impact Did Education Stimulus Funds Have on States and Schools?" the center found that in 2010, about 70 percent of the nation’s school districts used stimulus funds to save or create jobs for teachers and other school personnel. It also found that in 2011, a vast majority of the states reported that federal stimulus money had saved teaching jobs and other district and school-level positions.

In the report, "What Impact Did Education Stimulus Funds Have on States and Schools?" the center found that in 2010, about 70 percent of the nation’s school districts used stimulus funds to save or create jobs for teachers and other school personnel. It also found that in 2011, a vast majority of the states reported that federal stimulus money had saved teaching jobs and other district and school-level positions.

In the report, "What Impact Did Education Stimulus Funds Have on States and Schools?" the center found that in 2010, about 70 percent of the nation’s school districts used stimulus funds to save or create jobs for teachers and other school personnel. It also found that in 2011, a vast majority of the states reported that federal stimulus money had saved teaching jobs and other district and school-level positions.